Give this ring to my true knight, And bid him come to take his last farewell. What hast thou there? To prison, eyes, ne’er look on liberty! Nurse. London: Macmillan. So tedious is this day As is the night before some festival To an impatient child that hath new robes And may not wear them. JULIET And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband: Oh God, did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood? It did, it did; alas the day, it did! I’ll go bring Romeo to comfort you. And when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun. Move faster you fiery-footed horses, bearing the sun toward its nighttime resting place. he’s gone, he’s kill’d, he’s dead! Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Hie to your chamber. Come, night, you widow dressed in black, and teach me how to win my love so that we both can lose our virginities. With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold, Shame come to Romeo! Each Shakespeare’s play name links to a range of resources about each play: Character summaries, plot outlines, example essays and famous quotes, soliloquies and monologues: All’s Well That Ends Well Antony and Cleopatra As You Like It The Comedy of Errors Coriolanus Cymbeline Hamlet Henry IV Part 1 Henry IV Part 2 Henry VIII Henry VI Part 1 Henry VI Part 2 Henry VI Part 3 Henry V Julius Caesar King John King Lear Loves Labour’s Lost Macbeth Measure for Measure The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor A Midsummer Night’s Dream Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II Richard III Romeo & Juliet  The Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Timon of Athens Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida  Twelfth Night The Two Gentlemen of Verona The Winter’s Tale, Romeo and Juliet Play: Overview & Resources, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 3, Scene 2. [Giving The NURSE a ring] Oh, go and find him! But Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence. O Tybalt, Tybalt, the best friend I had! Pale, pale as ashes and covered in blood. Detailed quotes explanations with page numbers for every important quote on the site. But soft! There is no trust, faith, or honesty in men. Should I speak badly of my own husband? Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, That runaways’ eyes may wink, and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalked of and unseen. Teachers and parents! Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name. Come, loving, dark night. I’ll bring you there. O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! My tears will still be flowing because of Romeo’s banishment when their tears for Tybalt have gone dry. Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st. Romeo can,Though heaven cannot. Act 2 In the Act 2 Prologue, The Chorus explains Romeo and Juliet's intensifying love, and their determination to overcome the challenges posed by their rival families. PDF downloads of all 1379 LitCharts literature guides, and of every new one we publish. May blisters cover your tongue for making a wish like that! Ay me, what news? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name, End motion here, And thou and Romeo press one heavy bier. I am not I, if there be such an I; Oh, well-mannered, honorable Tybalt! Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit; God save the mark!—here on his manly breast. This page contains the original text of Act 3, Scene 2 of Romeo & Juliet. I wish I could forget it, but it forces its way into my memory the way sins obsess guilty minds. I belong to Romeo, but have not yet been enjoyed by him. Admiringly, he looks at her, finding her even more beautiful than the first time he saw her. Read expert analysis on Romeo and Juliet Act II - Scene II at Owl Eyes Romeo and Juliet. JULIET. JULIET Pale, pale as ashes, all bedaub’d in blood, Is Romeo slaughtered, and is Tybalt dead? If he be slain, say ‘I’; or if not, no: This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell. Oh, that deceit should dwell. They all break their oaths. JULIET O God, did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood? They all break their oaths. Suddenly the Nurse rushes in with news of the fight between Romeo and Tybalt. Honest gentleman!That ever I should live to see thee dead. Ah, my poor husband, who will speak well of you when I, your wife of three hours, have been calling you such dreadful names? Then, dreadful trumpet, sound the general doom! Juliet follows through on her plan. In the dark, lovers can still see enough, by the light of their own beauty, to make love. For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Say “yes” and that single word will poison me more terribly than could even the deadly gaze of the. Vile earth, to earth resign; end motion here; “Romeo has been banished.” The death contained in those four words is infinite, unmeasurable. I know where he is. Ah, where’s my man?—Give me some aqua vitae.— These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old. Mine shall be spent. Ah, weraday! Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye 920 Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity. Oh, here comes my Nurse, And she brings news, and every tongue that speaks But Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence.— Now, Nurse, what news? Ah, where’s my man?—Give me some aqua vitae.—. [Giving her a ring] O, find him! We are undone, lady, we are undone! Romeo responds in kind and they decide to marry the next day. Tybalt’s death Was woe enough, if it had ended there. Come, Romeo. I fainted at the sight of it. The rope ladder Romeo told you to get? Oh Tybalt, Tybalt, the best friend I ever had! Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night. When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-brow’d night, All slain, all dead. ROMEO He jests at scars that never felt a wound. JULIET O God! All perjured. Then, dreadful trumpet, sound the general doom! Brief sounds determine of my weal or woe. Tybalt’s death would have been misery enough even if nothing else had happened. Lovers can see to do their amorous rites Pale, pale as ashes, all bedaubed in blood. Oh, I have bought the mansion of love, but not yet possessed it. Line-by-line modern translations of every Shakespeare play and poem. Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice: 4. They’re all wicked. You’re like a day during the night, lying on the wings of night even whiter than snow on the wings of a raven. Romeo. Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back. Sole monarch of the universal earth, Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him! Romeo! He made you for a highway to my bed; Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? why dost thou wring thy hands? he was not born to shame: Will you speak well of him that kill’d your cousin? They’re all wicked. 5 Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, 6 That runaways' eyes may wink and Romeo … If he’s dead, say “yes.” If not, say “no.” Those little words will determine my joy or pain. Where’s my servant?—Get me some brandy—These griefs, these miseries, these sorrows make me old. K. Deighton. would whip you so hard that you would already have brought the sun west and night would come immediately. Death, not Romeo, will take my virginity! I saw it with my own eyes. Not yet enjoy’d: so tedious is this day And may not wear them. Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? To prison, eyes, ne’er look on liberty. what news? Every voice that speaks Romeo’s name speaks with heavenly beauty. Romeo and Juliet: Act 2, Scene 3 Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket. Ah, weraday! For who is living, if those two are gone? “Romeo is banishèd.” There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, In that word’s death. Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy. Scene II. He’s dead! Hath Romeo slain himself? I know where he is. My husband, whom Tybalt would have killed, is alive. A churchyard; in it a tomb belonging to the Capulets. _____ 2. abroad, out in the town. Come, thou day in night, For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night. Your tributary drops belong to woe, Juliet. My dear-loved cousin, and my dearer lord? Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? A hateful reality hidden by a beautiful appearance. Now, nurse, what news? Is Romeo slaughter’d, and is Tybalt dead? Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, A damnèd saint, an honorable villain! My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain, And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband. Romeo and Juliet. O, here comes my nurse, He’s hiding in Friar Lawrence’s cell. I would forget it fain. wolvish-ravening lamb! Phaeton would whip you so hard that you would already have brought the sun west and night would come immediately. Beautiful tyrant! Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare homepage | Romeo and Juliet . Beautiful tyrant! With thy black mantle, till strange love grows bold, Think true love acted simple modesty. God bless that wound—here on his manly chest. And madly play with my forefather's joints, And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud, ... Act 4, Scene 2 Act 4, Scene 3 Act 4, Scene 4. my S hakespeare. Scene 2. Weeping and wailing over Tybalt’s corse: Come with me, Nurse. Tybalt’s death would have been misery enough even if nothing else had happened. From Romeo and Juliet.Ed. Oh nature, what were you doing in hell when you placed the soul of a devil in the paradise of such a perfect man? I’ll get him. Tybalt and Petruccio see them first, and start a quarrel. Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, Towards Phoebus’ lodging. It is the east and Juliet is the sun! In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound. Nurse They all lie. Come, night. Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, 5. A pitiful corpse, a bloody, pitiful corpse. Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both, Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring. Or those eyes shut, that make thee answer ‘I.’ Towards Phoebus’ lodging: such a wagoner Did any dragon ever nest in such a pretty cave? Romeo and Juliet. Alack the day! Tybalt, my dearest cousin, and Romeo who as my husband was even more dear to me? He seemed like a saint, but should be damned! What devil art thou that dost torment me thus? Act 1, Prologue: PROLOGUE Act 1, Scene 1: Verona.A public place. For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d Play menu: Next scene Act I, Scene 3. He made you for a highway to my bed, But I, a maid, die maiden-widowèd. Give me my Romeo. That all the world will be in love with night May blisters cover your tongue for making a wish like that! I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes,– If they do see thee, they will murder thee. Friar Laurence then hurries to the Capulet tomb because it is nearly time for Juliet to wake. And needly will be ranked with other griefs, Why followed not, when she said “Tybalt’s dead,”. Enter JULIET May the last trumpet play to signal the onset of doomsday, because who could remain alive if those two are gone? Shame on Romeo! My tears will still be flowing because of Romeo’s banishment when their tears for Tybalt have gone dry. He’s dead! William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet (c. 1591)The Balcony Scene (Act 2, Scene 2) November 4, 2016 elizabeth.wasson Romeo and Juliet is one of Shakespeare’s most beloved plays, having been turned into paintings, ballets, and several operas. And thou and Romeo press one heavy bier! O that deceit should dwell Blister’d be thy tongue Shakespeare’s plays translated to modern English >>, Romeo and Juliet Script: Full Text of Romeo and Juliet, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Prologue, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Scene 1, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Scene 2, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Scene 3, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Scene 4, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 1, Scene 5, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Prologue, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 1, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 2, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 3, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 4, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 5, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 2, Scene 6, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 3, Scene 1, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 3, Scene 3, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 3, Scene 4, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 3, Scene 5, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 4, Scene 1, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 4, Scene 2, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 4, Scene 3, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 4, Scene 4, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 4, Scene 5, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 5, Scene 1, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 5, Scene 2, Romeo & Juliet Original Text: Act 5, Scene 3, https://www.nosweatshakespeare.com/romeo-juliet-play/text-act-3-scene-2/. I will cease to be myself if you say that Romeo killed himself. I am not I if there be such an I, Or those eyes shut that makes thee answer “ay.” If he be slain, say “ay,” or if not, “no.” Brief sounds determine of my weal or woe. Romeo that kill’d him, he is banished. Take this rope ladder, this poor rope ladder made useless because Romeo has been exiled. Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring; Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship And needly will be ranked with other griefs, Why followed not, when she said “Tybalt’s dead,” “Thy father” or “thy mother,” nay, or both, Which modern lamentations might have moved? There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship A damned saint, an honourable villain! When I, thy three hours’ wife, have mangled it? Summary: Act 3, scene 2. Crying over Tybalt’s corpse. Struggling with distance learning? Summary. O courteous Tybalt! Sole monarch of the universal earth. Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties, or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night. That would have pushed me into normal feelings of grief. Dove-feather’d raven! So why am I crying? Tybalt’s death. All acts & scenes are listed on the Romeo & Juliet original text page, or linked to from the bottom of this page.. ACT 2, SCENE 3. SCENE III. Worse news that kills me inside. He’s gone, he’s killed, he’s dead! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell, That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’ For who is living, if those two are gone? Where is my father, and my mother, nurse? Has any book with such awful contents ever had a more beautiful cover? Come, night. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? Oh, I have bought the mansion of love, but not yet possessed it. And that bare vowel ‘I’ shall poison more Hark ye, your Romeo will be here at night. Go to your bedroom. Romeo sees Juliet on her balcony and overhears her profess her love for him. Where is my father and my mother, Nurse? And when I die, take him and cut him into stars that will make the night sky so beautiful that the entire world will fall in love with the night and forget about the tasteless sun. Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring. These tears which seem like sadness for Tybalt’s death are actually tears of joy that Romeo is still alive. No words can express that misery. That would have pushed me into normal feelings of grief. Which modern lamentations might have moved? Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From … So why am I crying? FRIAR LAURENCE 1 The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night, 2 Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light, 3. fleckled: dappled. Enter JULIET O, I have bought the mansion of a love, Such a wagoner As Phaeton would whip you to the west And bring in cloudy night immediately. Now, Nurse, what’s your news? The death contained in those four words is infinite, unmeasurable. Will you go to them? And learn me how to lose a winning match, 3. He’s a beautiful tyrant! Come, thou day in night, For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back. He is immediately distracted, though, when he sees a light at a balcony window, and sees Juliet come out into the night. What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus? Nurse All in gore-blood; I swounded at the sight. Dramatis Personae ... Night becomes a place of safety within this play because the feud between the two families exists in the day-lit streets. Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? A hateful reality hidden by a beautiful appearance. Gory with blood. Start studying Romeo and Juliet: Act 2 Scene 3 Quotes. Oh, how could such betrayal hide in such a gorgeous body? Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Page | 39 ACT 2, SCENE 2 ROMEO returns ROMEO returns. What devil art thou that dost torment me thus? Shame could never be connected to him, because he is destined only to experience great and total honor. Hie to your chamber: I’ll find Romeo And needly will be rank’d with other griefs, And Tybalt, who wanted to kill my husband, is dead. Teacher Editions with classroom activities for all 1379 titles we cover. Romeo and Juliet: Annotated Balcony Scene, Act 2, Scene 2 Please see the bottom of the main scene page for more explanatory notes. ROMEO It's easy for someone to joke about scars if they've never been cut. Now, by my maidenhead, at twelve year old, I bade her come. As Phaethon would whip you to the west, Act 2 . ‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’ Text of ROMEO AND JULIET with notes, line numbers, and search function. The NURSE enters carrying the rope ladder. honest gentleman! The exact opposite of what he seemed. I’m going to my wedding bed. Where are my father and mother, Nurse? Shakespeare’s original Romeo & Juliet text is extremely long, so we’ve split the text into one Act & Scene per page. And Tybalt, who wanted to kill my husband, is dead. My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; But why, you villain, did you kill my cousin? This is good news. ENG 220 Prof. Lundell R+J 3-5 Act 4 holds a scene that acts as a watershed — a defining moment — within the play's overall structure. This list of Shakespeare plays brings together all 38 plays in alphabetical order. What storm is this to cause so many different disasters? Gory with blood. Every voice that speaks Romeo’s name speaks with heavenly beauty. Evaluate creative choices, design decisions and contextual considerations as Ben compares how meaning is conveyed in these two adaptations from the Royal Shakespeare Company and Shakespeare’s Globe. God bless that wound—here on his manly chest. If he’s dead, say “yes.” If not, say “no.” Those little words will determine my joy or pain. He’s dead. I’ll go bring Romeo to comfort you. No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured, Characters . There’s no trust, Wash they his wounds with tears? No words can that woe sound. Romeo! He seemed like a saint, but should be damned! Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine, That all the world will be in love with night. O, find him! I saw it with my own eyes. poor bankrupt, break at once! Nurse Additional Plays. ‘Romeo is banished!’ It was Romeo who killed Tybalt, which is why he was banished. Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death, And pay no worship to the garish sun. I would forget it fain, But oh, it presses to my memory, Like damnèd guilty deeds to sinners’ minds. Ah, my poor husband, who will speak well of you when I, your wife of three hours, have been calling you such dreadful names? Pale, pale as ashes, all bedaubed in blood, All in gore blood. What kind of a devil are you to torment me in this way? But I, a maid, die maiden-widowed. As Phaëton would whip you to the west. You’re like a day during the night, lying on the wings of night even whiter than snow on the wings of a raven. Say thou but “ay,” And that bare vowel I shall poison more Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice. I refuse to cry. Now, Nurse, what’s your news? Who ever would have thought it? That ever I should live to see thee dead. About “Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 2” The Nurse gives Juliet a garbled transmission of what has just happened. During this scene, Juliet's decision to just accept the Friar's potion demonstrates her commitment to defying her father's rule, asserting her independence, and accepting her resolution to die so as to be with Romeo. Say “yes” and that single word will poison me more terribly than could even the deadly gaze of the cockatrice. Leap to these arms, untalked of and unseen. Think true love acted simple modesty. All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers. Come, night, with your darkness, so that Romeo can come to me without anyone knowing and leap into my arms. the cords Was ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? Read Act 2, Scene 2 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, side-by-side with a translation into Modern English. Act III: Scene 2. O, break, my heart, poor bankrupt, break at once! That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband: Hood my unmanned blood bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle, till strange love, grow bold, Think true love acted simple modesty. Nurse Oh, here comes my Nurse, bringing news. Has Romeo killed himself? Nurse He’s killed. That villain cousin would have killed my husband. Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banishèd.Romeo that killed him—he is banishèd. Take up those cords.—Poor ropes, you are beguiled. Where’s my servant?—Get me some brandy—These griefs, these miseries, these sorrows make me old. Friar Laurence discovers that Friar John, the messenger he sent to Mantua with a letter to Romeo explaining that Juliet is alive, has been quarantined because of an outbreak of the plague and prevented from leaving Verona. He is hid at Lawrence’ cell. These tears which seem like sadness for Tybalt’s death are actually tears of joy that Romeo is still alive. Hood my unmann’d blood, bating in my cheeks, Was ever book containing such vile matter JULIET. give me some aqua vitae: Instant PDF downloads. A piteous corse, a bloody piteous corse; And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night; This page contains the original text of Act 2, Scene 3 of Romeo & Juliet.Shakespeare’s original Romeo & Juliet text is extremely long, so we’ve split the text into one Act & Scene per page. Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished; Or, if love is blind, then it is best suited to the night. Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death. When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend, Was ever book containing such vile matter, So fairly bound? This torture should be roared in dismal hell. Read Full Text and Annotations on Romeo and Juliet Act II - Scene II at Owl Eyes. Learn how to interpret and analyse two versions of Act 3, Scene 2 from Romeo and Juliet with writer, actor and producer Ben Crystal in At Home with Shakespeare. You’re going to speak well of the man who killed your cousin? The cords That Romeo bid thee fetch? But with a rearward following Tybalt’s death. I’m going to my wedding bed. I refuse to cry. And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead! Outside on the Verona street, Benvolio and Mercutio wait around for Romeo to meet them. Come, gentle night. Then, dreadful trumpet, sound the general doom! Come, cords.—Come, Nurse. All this is comfort. He’s a beautiful tyrant! Take this rope ladder, this poor rope ladder made useless because Romeo has been exiled. call her forth to me. Phaeton would whip you so hard that you would already have brought the sun west and night would come immediately. He’s a villain who seemed honorable! Where are my father and mother, Nurse? Romeo was not born to have anything to do with shame. Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds: No words can that woe sound. That villain cousin would have killed my husband. he’s dead, he’s dead, he’s dead! Fiend angelical! [Enter Romeo.] Vile earth, to earth resign. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of. Come with me, rope ladder. “Romeo has been banished.”. Romeo. About; ... Close. This torture should be roared in dismal hell. But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? Capulet’s orchard. Has any book with such awful contents ever had a more beautiful cover? I would not for the world they saw thee here. Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! what, ladybird! “Tybalt is dead, and Romeo has been banished.” That word “banished,” that single word “banished,” is worse than the death of ten thousand Tybalts. Wash they his wounds with tears? In the dark, lovers can still see enough, by the light of their own beauty, to make love. Wash they his wounds with tears: mine shall be spent, What is that you have there? (Romeo; Juliet; Nurse) Romeo comments scathingly on Mercutio’s comments as he hears the latter leave. Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, All slain, all dead. Whiter than new snow on a raven’s back. But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? They all lie. Romeo was not born to have anything to do with shame. say thou but ‘I,’ Romeo has been banished. He was not born to shame. That Romeo bid thee fetch? Take up those cords.—Poor ropes, you are beguiled, Both you and I, for Romeo is exiled. [Juliet appears above at a window.] A room in Capulet’s house. Come, civil night, Nurse Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished; Romeo that kill'd him, he is banished. Pay attention: your Romeo will be here tonight. I wish I could forget it, but it forces its way into my memory the way sins obsess guilty minds. Despised substance of divinest show! Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match Played for a pair of stainless maidenhoods. Juliet. But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? Weeping and wailing over Tybalt’s corse. Worse news that kills me inside. Pay attention: your Romeo will be here tonight. But why, you villain, did you kill my cousin? O serpent heart hid with a flowering face! fiend angelical! Nurse LitCharts Teacher Editions. As is the night before some festival Do they wash Tybalt’s wounds with their tears? Romeo! I’ll bury my body in the earth, where it will lie motionless and share a single coffin with Romeo. Though heaven cannot: O Romeo, Romeo! Or, if misery loves company, and one grief must necessarily follow another, then it would have been better had the Nurse, after telling me that Tybalt was dead, then told me that my mother or my father, or even both, were gone. And bring in cloudy night immediately. Who ever would have guessed? Definitions and examples of 136 literary terms and devices. And bid him come to take his last farewell. Mine shall be spent When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment. The Nurse arrives and in her grief, misleads Juliet into thinking that Romeo … Romeo can, To comfort you: I wot well where he is. Year Published: 1597 Language: English Country of Origin: United States of America Source: Shakespeare, W. Romeo and Juliet New York: Sully and Kleinteich Read Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, scene 2 for free from the Folger Shakespeare Library! All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then? What storm is this that blows so contrary? O Romeo, Romeo!Who ever would have thought it? “Romeo is banishèd.”.

romeo and juliet act 3, scene 2 script

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